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Turin and Piedmont

Turin was the most French of Italian cities, since it was its closest neighbour, and still produced some of the grandest Royal Palaces in the nation, themed on buildings such as those of Versailles. In the 1770s, Piedmont and Turin-based Neoclassical furniture was essentially French in style, and its greatest son in that field was Giuseppe Maria Bonzanigo who made what was believed to be the best Italian Neoclassical furniture, with his elegant designs and luxurious materials.[2]

Milan and Lombardy

Milanese and Lombard designs were still very well known for being simple and sober, usually including furniture which was made out of walnut and which was not gilded. The city and the region were very famous for their cabinet-making and the probably the greatest ebenista (carpenter) from there was Giuseppe Maggioloni.[2]

Rome and Lazio

Ancient Rome's architecture inspired the Neoclassical movement, thus the city was a major epicentre for interior design made according to that style. Giuseppe Valadier was famous for making Roman Neoclassicism unique, including his bold and grandly sculpted tables. He was also famous for giving the city a dramatic facelift, restoring many of the ancient monuments and making grandiose classical marble tables, which were often gilded in gold to give a dazzling effect of wealth,[2] just like in the Roman times.

Venice and the Veneto

Venice and the Veneto were still famous for making their grand and extravagant Rococo mirrors, amongst the best and most expensive in Europe.[2] Their interiors were still very rich in style, and it took them a long time to change to the new Neoclassical style. However, with their mirrors going out of fashion, and in desperate need of money after 1797, the Venetians eventually gave in to the new style. Despite this, Venetian mirrors still had rich cartouches and were often gilded with gold.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Italian_Neoclassical_interior_design#History.2C_background_and_influences